Kamorta Class : Analysis of India’s Deadly Anti-Submarine Corvette

INTRODUCTION

Anti-Submarine corvettes are a particular class of ships which are the unsung heroes in a Navy. They are overshadowed by frigates, destroyers and aircraft carriers and seldom get the attention they need from the public. Many navies lack this category of ships as they depend on bigger combatants to do the job. But the increasing threat of modern submarines has made Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) ships, a basic need for a powerful Navy. Different navies have different designations for their ASW ships. The US Navy has the Littoral Combat Ship, the Royal Navy depends on bigger ASW frigates, the Russian and Indian Navies uses ASW corvettes and so on. Each navy has different tactics and roles for their ASW ships, so here in this article, we will analyse the Kamorta class ASW corvette of the Indian Navy and see what it is capable of.

ORIGINS

Since 1968, ASW corvettes have been a part of the Indian Navy’s operational strategy. They procured 11 Petya class frigates from the Soviet Union between 1968-72 and designated them as Arnala class ASW corvettes. These 1150 ton ships were fast and good at ASW, but had the following drawbacks.

  • They lacked the range and endurance for blue water operations
  • Had poor quality hulls which needed major and frequent refits
  • Lacked the ability to carry an ASW helicopter
  • Had almost no self-defense capability
An Arnala Class corvette of the Indian Navy fires its RBU-2500 ASW rockets

These corvettes were restricted to escort role for missile boats which were also short-range vessels. They were also used to a limited degree as ocean-going escorts. The Indian Navy was happy with these ships in the following role until its transition into an aspiring blue water navy. They realized that these ASW corvettes needed to be replaced by a ship which overcame all the drawbacks of the existing class. They also needed a ship which would be equally effective in the littorals as well as in the deep oceans. This resulted in the development of the Kamorta class corvette. The Kamorta would offer the following performance enhancements over the Arnala class.

  • Thrice the displacement, resulting in more space for weapons and sensors
  • Provision of hangar and helipad for an ASW helicopter
  • Advanced radars and sonars
  • Long endurance, enabling it to operate in blue water
  • Ultra quiet propulsion and engines
  • High standard build quality
The older Petya (Arnala) class ASW corvette
kam
The new Kamorta class ASW corvette


DESIGN

kamorta 3

The Kamorta class has been designed for the sole purpose of hunting submarines. It has a displacement of 3400 tons, a length of 109 m and a beam of 13 m. These dimensions are comparable to that of a frigate as the Kamorta has been designed for blue water ops as well. The Kamorta is touted by the Indian Navy as having over 90% indigenous content. The steel and composites which have been used in construction are indigenously made along with a majority of the weapons and sensors. It is powered by 4 Pielstick diesel engines generating 3888 kW each, which drive 2 controllable pitch propellers via the gearboxes. Each ship has a crew of 150 sailors and 15 officers and a very ergonomic design which focuses on crew comfort.

It has the following advanced design features which make it a suitable platform for submarine hunting.

  • X-form hull with sloped superstructure sides which reduce radar cross-section and make it very stealthy.
  • Raft mounted gearbox and engines, which damp the vibrations and reduce the acoustic signature of the ship. This is important to remain undetected from hostile submarines.
  • Range of 6500+ km at 18 kts ( 33km/hr) which allows long deployments
  • Combined Diesel and Diesel (CODAD) propulsion for quiet and efficient running of the ship
xfor
X-form hull to deflect radar

You can see from this that special emphasis has been laid on reducing the acoustic signature of the ship as much as possible. This is very important while it is searching for hostile submarines. The Kamorta needs to detect the submarines and engage them before it itself is detected and engaged.


SENSORS

The Kamorta is the first ship of the Indian Navy to be operationally deployed with an indigenously developed primary radar. The Revathi is a 3D radar operating in the S-band. It is a multi-role radar and is used for both surface and air search up to a distance of 200 km. It is designated as the Central Acquisition radar (CAR) as it is used to acquire aerial and surface targets before the fire control radar can direct the gunfire towards them. It will also act as a target acquisition radar for the VL-Mica surface to air missiles which will be fitted in the future. This missile doesn’t need a fire control radar as it has an active radar seeker in its nose which finds and locks onto targets on its own.

 

revathi
Revathi 3D CAR

The TMX EO Mk2 is an X-band fire control radar with secondary electro-optical and IR sensors for targeting. 2 such radars are fitted, one at the fore and another at the aft. The one at the fore provides fire control for the 76 mm gun and the one at the aft provides fire control for the Ak-630 guns.

tmx
TMX EO Mk2

They have an indigenous bow mounted sonar and an Atlas Elektronik towed array sonar. The bow sonar is the primary underwater sensor and the VLF towed array is used to detect submarines hiding under thermoclines in the water. The sonar gives targeting data for the ASW rocket launcher. The embarked helicopter will have its own dunking sonar and drop sonobouys as well.


WEAPONS

The Indian Navy needed a ship which has the armament of a 1200 ton corvette and the endurance of a 3400 ton frigate

The weapons suite  comprises of a collection of systems to attack submarines and defend itself. The following weapons are present on the Kamorta

  • 1 x 76 mm Oto Melara Super Rapid Gun Mount (SRGM) for engaging surface and aerial threats up to 16 km away.
  • 2 x RBU-6000 ASW rocket launchers designated as IRL (Indigenous Rocket Launchers). Each launcher is 12 barreled and has a reload of 96 rockets under the deck. They are retained because of their hardkill ability and immunity against countermeasures. These rockets have a range of 4500 m and a shaped charge warhead which can be set to explode at a particular depth. It can punch a hole in the hull of a submarine or be used to defend against an incoming torpedo. The rocket, after it is fired, reaches the required location and falls in the water where it sinks until it reaches its target. Usually, 24 rockets with various warheads are ripple fired against the incoming target to achieve maximum kill rate.
  • 2 x Ak 630 Gatling guns are placed above the helicopter hangar. They are the Close in Weapons System (CIWS) and are used for last-ditch defense against anti-ship missiles. This 30 mm 6-barreled gun has a rate of fire of 5000 rounds per minute and can be used to engage aerial targets at a range of 3 km and surface targets at 4 km.
  • 533 mm torpedo tubes for launching heavyweight torpedoes. These have a maximum engagement range of around 20 km.
  • Space left for the installation of 16/32 VL-Mica Surface to Air Missiles. They will be procured under the category of SR-SAM and locally named as Maitri.
  • 1 helicopter hangar for housing an ASW helicopter. The S-70B Seahawk will be embarked on it in the future after the Indian Navy receives it. This will be an extremely vital weapon system as the helicopter can engage submarines several hundred kilometers form the ship.
ak630
Ak-630 CIWS
kam gun
76 mm Oto Melara Super Rapid Gun Mount (SRGM)
rbu
RBU-6000

The Kamorta is not under-armed, but over-sized

There is a widespread misconception that the Kamorta is poorly armed for a 3400 ton ship. But it is very wrong to look at things like that at face value without understanding the logic and naval doctrine for behind them. The Indian Navy needed a ship which has the armament of a 1200 ton corvette and the endurance of a 3400 ton frigate. Basically it is not under-armed, but over-sized. By 2017, it is expected to receive its SAM package consisting of 16-32 VL-Mica missiles which have a range of 15 km and an active seeker. This missile can intercept sea-skimming and supersonic cruise missiles and protect the Kamorta class from submarine launched cruise missiles.

tt
533 mm torpedo tubes
ASWC at FOJ-715257
A Kamorta Class Corvette under construction. Note the space where the SR-SAM will be installed in the future.

However, one question always arises. “Why build an ASW corvette with limited capabilities, when you can build a multi-role frigate which can do much more?”

The answer to this question can be obtained from observing the latest ships in the Indian Navy. The Shivalik class frigates and Kolkata class destroyers have an ASW specific equipment suite consisting of ASW rocket launchers, torpedo tubes, medium range guns, anti missile guns, sonars and surface to air missiles. What the Kamorta does is it just puts all the ASW and self-defense equipment from these 6400+ ton ships on a 3400 ton ship. This means that you now have a ship with the same ASW capabilities as a larger one and at a fraction of the total cost! So instead of sending a 1 billion $ destroyer for patrolling the oceans to hunt submarines, you can send a 250 million $ corvette to do the same job, just as effectively. This allows the Indian Navy to have 4 such corvettes for the price of 1 destroyer.

ROLE IN COMBAT

INS Kamorta (3).JPG

The main role of these ships will be to hunt the quiet submarines of Pakistan’s growing underwater fleet and the Chinese submarines which have been venturing into the Indian Ocean. 4 ships of this class have been ordered under Project 28 and a further 8 may follow on. There is no official information available regarding how the Kamorta class will be used in combat. That’s why i have presented the following ideas about what these ships will do during war and peace.

  • Carrier Escort
Indian_Navy_flotilla_Vikramaditya1
INS Vikramaditya being escorted by the frigate INS Talwar

In this role, it will accompany the aircraft carrier and be integrated into the carrier battle group (CBG). It could be used as the initial detection screen where it sails 50 km ahead of the CBG and searches for submarines waiting to ambush the carrier. It can be paired with friendly submarines and ASW aircraft like the P-8I to offer superior protection to the aircraft carrier. It may be integrated into the INS Vikramaditya CBG in the future along with the Talwar class frigates and Kolkata class destroyers.

  • Littoral Warfare
Kora class corvette

In this role, it will basically accompany the Kora and other classes of missile boats which serve in the Indian Navy during operations in shallow water. These missile boats lack any sort of ASw capability and will be totally dependent on the Kamortas for protection. A similar combination was used successfully by the Indian Navy in the 1971 war.

  • Surface Combatant Escort

In this role, they basically accompany a major surface combatant like a frigate or a destroyer. Here, the Kamorta will act as a mini frigate with the same ASW capabilities as the larger ship. Hence larger ships can be saved for more important tasks.

INS Kamorta with the frigate INS Satpura
  • Submarine Shadowing

Instead of sending a 7000 ton destroyer just to shadow an enemy submarine, a Kamorta class corvette does the same job. It will be more economical than sending a larger ship and the destroyers can be used for more important tasks. They will be used in peace and war to trail hostile submarines and destroy them if needed. These ships will be networked with ASW aircraft for more efficient tracking and detection of submarines.

P-8I ASW aircraft

CONCLUSION

1

INS Kamorta in China during a naval exercise ©Liuwangne

The Kamorta class are future proof and will remain as front line warships for several decades. The total number of ships in the class may end up being 12 if the Indian Navy goes for a follow on order of 8 more ships. These ships will be vital for patrolling Indian and International waters and keeping shipping lanes free from hostile submarines. Constant upgrades in the future will keep them in top fighting condition and give a headache to hostile submarines.

You may also like Dragon vs elephant (Part-1): The Indian Navy’s massive modernization drive

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168 thoughts on “Kamorta Class : Analysis of India’s Deadly Anti-Submarine Corvette

      1. That’s why they are High end Corvettes and on the low End of a Frigate. If you look at Europe, they build Frigates that nearly on the High end bordering on the low end of a Destroyer. In Europe, a Corvette would be on the Low end of a Frigate. The Kamorta would most likely be used a corvette/ light frigate.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. didn’t know you also used that comment here, it’s like the PN’s frigate, more like a high-end corvette than a frigate, if only we could go to Russia and ask for the Gepard but stupid DND doesn’t want Russian warships

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      1. Its called “NATO SYSTEMS INTEROPERABILITY”. Russian systems dont have this. Our close allies namely: US, Japan, South Korea, and Australia use this.

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  1. Wonderful Article NRP.

    1) Why is the Indian Navy acquiring VL MICA SAM for its corvettes? We already have Barak 1 in service, why dont we just use it and upgrade to Barak 8 when it enters service?
    2) If there is enough space on the ship, why doesn’t the Indian navy add a few Brahmos missiles to the ship? it need not be a 16 missile load like the Shivaliks and the Kolkatas, but a smaller load of Say, 8 missiles to give it an extra edge?

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    1. Thank you
      1) barak-1 uses command guidance which limits the number of missiles guided at once. It also require dedicated fire control radars which occupy space. Mica is active radar homing and doesn’t need a fire control radar. It offers 5-% rage increase over the 10 km range Barak-1. Also The Barak-8 is a large and long range SAM which is not suitable for all kinds of ships. For defensive purposes VL Mica is ideal.

      2) Adding Brahmos consumes precious real estate, under deck connections and dedicated radars are required to guide it. It also increases crew requirement and increases the cost and so on. India wanted a pure ASW ship, makes no sense to put Brahmos on it. Enough warships will deploy the Brahmos in the future.

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  2. but admin , u used to post a lot earlier …… why are u reducing the frequency of ur marvellous articles nowadays ?? 😦 .. this article was an eye opener .. 🙂

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    1. Akash is in a different league altogether. It’s heavy and outdated for naval use. It uses command guidance and the missile weighs 800 kg compared to Mica which will weigh less than 100 kg. Akash is equivalent to the large Goa SAM on board the Indian rajput class destroyers which require massive space under deck and dedicated launchers. It’s just not even plausible to think of using Akash on board ships. It would be like going back to 1950.

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      1. Thanks for reply, but I am afraid my doubts remain unclear these are my following doubts..
        > You said Aakash is an entire different league so exactly which league? any counterparts? Is it comparable to S 500??
        > Apart from size how exactly land based SAMs are different from Ship based SAMs? I mean as I mentioned the indigenous radar on board Kamotra was developed for Akash missiles so if radars can be modified and you know the know how. Then why you can’t do if for Missiles.
        >Are Barak 8 missiles replacements for CIWS? Because it can aftetall shoot shoot incoming Ashms at a very close range.

        P.S. you said at ‘it will be like going back to 50s.’ Did anyone even had SAMs during those ages. Check out some videos on net. In one of them you will find Russians trying to ‘shoot’ a plane with rockets ( as it is done for drones today) into air for intetcepting American jets. This proves there were no SAMs. 🙂

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      2. 1) Akash is in league with 70s era SAMs like the Soviet Kub in terms of physical nature ad propulsion. The only thing is that the electronics are contemporary and the range has been increased slightly. It is no way close to the S500, which is an anti-ballistic missile SAM with 500+ km range.

        2) Land based SAMs are generally adapted for naval use and vice versa. But not in the case of Akash. If it were adapted as a naval SAM , it would be too heavy and outdated. It is the equivalent of naval Volna-M SAM.

        The Revathi and its land based counterpart were not developed solely for the Akash system. They are early warning radars and play no role in guiding the Akash missile. They can be used with any SAM for early warning and with active radar homing SAMs for target designation.

        3) Tweaking radars and missiles for naval use is easy enough. But not in the case of Akash which uses slant launch and is too big. It also has no seeker. All modern naval SAMs have active radar seekers. The changes required will be enormous and the Navy is better off with a modern system developed for naval use.

        For comparison, the 800 kg Akash has a 35 km range and the 280 kg Barak-8 has a 70+ km range.

        4) Barak-8 is technically a replacement for CIWS missiles like barak-1 as it can intercept targets as close as 500 m.
        5) The going back to the ’50s was a typo. I meant the ’60s when long-range naval SAMs had no seekers and used command guidance.

        6) There were SAMs in the ’50s as well. The S-75 Dvina was introduced in 1957.

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  3. Hi dis is exactly the kind of article. I was searching for nice to read it. My request why don’t you right an article regarding shivalik class frigates. Hour are they compare to other frigates around the world. Plzzz consider my request.

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  4. Nicely written and well researched article. Had been waiting for such a detailed study of the Kamorta class for long. Thanks to NRP for this work. Indian navy is expanding like never before with advanced systems carrying ships being inducted in regular intervals. By the end of the next decade, the face of the Indian navy would be altered for ever achieving true blue water capability with long legs for power projection in seas faraway. One again thanks for sharing such a wonderful article with us.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. 1) Dude ,you have a write a article about air defence capablities of india against pakistan and india ,there is no information about it on web also about DRDO working on ultra long range Air defence missile on the lines of S 400.
    2) Is Maitri a co development between MBDA and DRDO as a replacement for trishul project with 100% kill probablity but they haven’t started development yet???
    3) Why cant india go to Rolling Airframe Missile instead of Maitri??

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    1. 1) Ok
      2) Maitri is a modification of the existing VL Mica SAM. It can be done in a short time.
      3) India is keen on vertically launched SAMs for its warships. RAM doesn’t have vertical launch and it’s coverage is limited to one side.

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    2. Too bad. The weapons are almost imported and awaiting foreign supplier’s shipments, making the construction costs higher than that of a frigate or destroyer where compare with others.

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  6. Dear NRP,

    Why is the Indian navy still stuck with 72 mm Naval guns(in destroyers, frigates, corvettes) when NATO, China is going for 155mm guns.

    Thanks,

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    1. India is not stuck with 76 mm and China is not going for 155 mm.

      In naval guns , higher caliber doesn’t mean better. Each caliber has its own advantages. 155 mm is for land attack purpose and 76 mm is for anti-ship and anti-missile purposes.

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      1. So that means the Indian Navy ships can carry out land attack only with missiles. They could have opted for 155mm Naval Guns for the destroyers and 76mm for the Frigates.

        Your thoughts please. Many thanks

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      2. They are going for 127 mm guns for new destroyers and frigates. They’ll have special land attack munitions. There’s no 155 mm naval gun on the market for sale now.

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  7. Wow! What a detailed & informative article it is.Keep up the good work.
    Have you any info about DRDO developing S or X-Band AESA Radar for use on warships?

    Regards

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    1. Thank you 🙂 I have heard rumors that DRDO may be developing an s-band aesa for small warships. But I guess they’ll retain the capable planar array s-band Revathi for now.

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  8. I have not seen detailed analysis on Indian defence like this in any other articles on web.Please write an article on future Indian aircraft carriers (like how many do we require) and on INS Vishal.

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  9. One of the things I have noticed about recent ship construction for the Indian Navy is that while the ships are well equipped in the “FLOAT” and “MOVE” departments, where indigenous content is high, the “FIGHT” department, with lower indigenous content lacks punch. This may be due to delays in procuring critical weapon systems such as SAMs and anti ship missiles.
    Case in point are Saryu class patrol vessels which lack any missile armament and also Kolkata class destroyers which have no SAMs at present. Not sure if this is a deliberate omission or simply lethargy on the part of MOD.
    Personally, I was rather disappointed with the Kamorta weapons fit – I expected both Barak SAM (as PDMS) and ASW missiles (potentially Russian KLUB class). Perhaps these would be a future fit.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Patrol vessels all over the world generally don’t carry missiles.

      Kolkata class will get their missiles by the end of 2015.

      Have you read this article properly ? I have cease mentioned the SR-SAM will be fitted later on in the Kamortas.

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    2. Thank you. I think my concern is more around vessels that are launched impromptu without adequate weapons fit. Completely agree that SAMs could be a later fit and there are instances of vessels being asked to sail without complete weaponry from other countries as well. My concern is more that this seems to be a habit with Indian ships. Case in point your note about the Type 15A destroyers, currently without anti air assets, and somewhat light on the anti surface department as well. Though there is space for additional fitments (potentially 8 Nirbhays per your note) still, the existing equipment is light/ incomplete. The point I am trying to get to is that is this due to a lighter design or merely poor acquisition planning?

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      1. That’s not because of poor planning. The IN have got their priorities right. But these missiles have been delayed which isn’t their fault.

        16 Brahmos isn’t light by any standards. They can cause more damage than 48 Harpoon/Exocet.

        And do you remember that the British Type-45 destroyers didn’t have their Aster SAMs for nearly 3 years after the first ship was commissioned. And most of them still haven’t got Harpoons. This is a problem faced by major navies having a major transition in technology.

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  10. kamorta class is project 28 corvettes, India planned 8 project 28A class corvettes. is that project 28A will be improved version of P28 class or it will be the same? Cause project 17A class frigates will be improved version of Prohect 28 Shivalik class frigates.

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  11. Awesome article, I am extremely glad to read whole info. New things I learnt was about rhinemetal target designator for 76mm gun. But I genuinely feel, we should steal/borrow/devolep our own ATAS and other sensors, just look at china. Every country has history of technological espionage. Bye the way thank you. Keep writing.

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  12. Great article! Man you are the best analyst in my opinion.
    One thing I don’t understand. Why Indian navy want 6 billion $ Maitri project while DRDO is developing new VL medium range low level quick reaction missile(LLQRM) for three armed branches of India. It is said to be more capable than Akash SAM(50 km range), equivalent to new VL Shtil 1 SAM. I think it will be an Indian ESSM, can be quad packed, 360 degree coverage, 50 km range, can perform SR, MR SAM duties. I am not doubting capabilities of Mica SAM but 6 billion figure is way more for any SRSAM. I think they should use this money to replace aged Rajput class destroyer.

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      1. as per the recent revisions requiring space for an eight-cell VLS FFBNW, and CODAD propulsion, the Kamorta has edged over the Incheon frigate as Hyundai might noot have enough time to modify the Incheon, the Kamorta’s lead opponents now are Navantia’s Avante 2200 and STX France’s NG2F, but because the Kamorta will be built in India, then lower labor costs

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      2. and based on what the Philippine Navy wants, it’s going to be a Kamorta, instead of ASW rockets, we’re going to put an mk41 VLS, and instead of your CIWS, we’ll install a refurbished CIWS from America

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      3. Since we want a GP Frigate, not an ASW corvette, could the ASROC launchers be removed and replaced with more VLS cells?

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      4. N.R.P. if the RBU launchers will be replaced with 16-cell VLS, ansd you add the additional space for another 16 cells aft, then a Kamorta can theoretically carry 32 VLS cells right?

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      5. We aren’t, arming the ship heavily, the planned armament for now is just an 8-16 VLS and a Phalanx, also, all ships of the Philippine Navy have some sort of secondary armament for defense against small boats, particularly the mk38 gun, where would the ml38’s be placed on the Kamorta?

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    1. as per tender, the ship is required to be built close to US Navy standards, must have space and power for an 8-cell mk41 VLS and 1 CIWS, the ship will already be fitted with a 76mm Super Rapid, a launcher that can accomodate the Blue Shark torpedo, the manufacturer’s choice of two twin MANPADS mounts, and a 30-40mm secondary gun, sensors will include a 3D-radar and a hull-mounted sonar

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      1. @N.R.P. exactly, if Hyundai takes too long to modify the CODOG propulsion of its Incheon frigate, and if STX takes too long to modify the NG2F to military standards then the Kamorta will have an edge over Navantia because of cheaper labor cost

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      2. N.R.P. there are rumors that the Kamorta has won the bidding. And if it did win, we require 4 AshM’s with the ship, is it possible that you could out a 4-cell Brahmos VLS on the Kamorta?

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      3. 4 cell Brahmos launcher doesn’t exist at present. The 8 cell module needs to be modified into 4 cells by removing the rest. Of Kamorta did win, it would be interesting. Also the Kh-35 is another possible option for Kamorta.

        Keep me updated. Thank you.

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      4. The 1 because we do not need a long range SAM, but our navy prefers American systems, so is it possible to integrate an mk41 VLS and a Phalanx CIWS

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      5. So can a possible loadout for the Kamorta be an 8-cell Brahmos VLS forward, and 16-cell ESSM VLS aft and a Phalanx?

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      6. Good news, the Kamorta is now undergoing post-qualification chechs with the DND, if she indeed qualifies for all the specs of the Philippine Navy, the contract will be ssigned by April

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Looks like the Kamorta might be it, the only thing stopping GRSE is racist Filipino military fanbois, the FFBNW VLS might already be selected, I do hope we choose the Barak 8 SAM for our frigates plus 8 Brahmos missiles

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  13. Nice informative article. Very unique compared to other copy – paste versions on the net. Was amused to see amaeturish comments with inclination towards heavy missiles and armaments.

    Guys submarine warfare theatre is not more than just 5 kms in radius. To sink a submarine you have to get on top of it. More submarines have been sunk with depth charges than with torpedoes (like RBU-6000). There is no such thing as firing a couple of missiles several kms away and sinking a sub, that is very hypothetical.

    It is very aptly put that Komarta is not underarmed but oversized. It needs to carry more fuel and powerful sensors to find and hunt submarines. Secondly crew comfort is very important, like the European navies IN too understands this.

    Bigger is not always best:
    Putting Brahmos missiles on each and every ship will be overkill and make the ships inefficient. Bigger missiles even if they are supersonic are easily detectable.

    Destroyers vs Frigates:
    It is a misconception that Destroyers are bigger and Frigates are smaller. Just to sum up the difference – Destroyers are heavily armed as compared to their weight, and Frigates are lightly armed compared to their wt. So yoy can have a 5000t destroyer with a firepower of a 7000t frigate.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. just a correction….RBU-6000 is a rocket propelled depth-charge and not a torpedo. In an event of submarine hunting RBU-6000 is likely to sink a sub than the torpedoes. In submarine warfare it is more likely that you will never actually detect and track submarine (submerged) directly, instead you get faint tale-tell signs of presence of the sub and then you bombard the entire area with depth-charges. What they did in WW2 still holds good against subs.

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  15. Awesome article, I too want to put my 2 cents – In my opinion Kamorta ASWs ships are the most important ships from India’s perspective. Shivalik, Kolkatas, Talwars, Delhi are all multi-role ships….like all-rounders of a cricket team, jack of all trades master of the none. In a naval warfare the most potent threat is from submarines and from the air – aircraft carriers and upto certain extent multi-role ships can neutralize the air threat but it is ships like Kamorta and other dedicated ASW ships that will play major role in anti-submarine operations.

    I agree with NUPS – modern submarines are hard to detect and it is very unlikely that you will actually “see” a sub and then go and sink it. Oceans and seas are vast and subs are very very elusive beneath them. Subs always have upper-hand when compared to surface ships, smaller subs make matter even worse. The answer to this problem is to have sizeable number of smaller/medium and quieter dedicated surface ships like Kamorta, Submarine hunting planes and smaller subs of our own.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. I agree with your points. It is very necessary to have dedicated ships for ASW in order to free up the multi-role frigates and destroyers for other duties.

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  16. Congrats for such dedicated effort. Expect some articles on the probable submarine (conventional and nuclear attack) acquisition by Indian Nevy in near future. Thanks.

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  17. this seems a good cost-effective ship for my country, the Philippines, which is under budget constraints for defense spending. just a few hours ago a reliable defense blogger posted that the Kamorta class corvette won the bidding for the defense department’s frigate acquisition program. not a bad ship. in fact it’s too good for Php.18billion for 2 ships.

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  18. Hi. Great blog, I am envious. I just want to ask, where will they put the AShMs on this ship?

    Also, can it accommodate at least an eight-cell VLS for the Brahmos?

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      1. The Philippine order requires “fitted for but not with” AShM. I wonder if the first pair of Komorta exports will have a barak-ready or harpoon-ready vls. How different are the fcr, vls and other systems needed for either missile?

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      2. Harpoon cannot be fired from a vls. Only inclined tube launchers exist. Doesn’t need a FCR.

        Barak is a totally different category. It’s a small SAM with a compact vls. It needs a single FCR , for which place already exists ( The rear Ak-630 FCR can be replaced by this).

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      3. You mentioned in articles that there is already space for 16/32 MICA SAMs(Now reported to be Barak 8), it can accommodate 16/32 VLS missile without removing RBU-6000s, can there be big AShM missiles like BrahMos or Harpoon, AFAIK Harpoon is cheaper than Exocet without removing RBUs?

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      4. I have marked out the space for SAM. Kindly have a look. That space is a shallow region capable of accommodating short missiles only. The VL-Mica is confirmed as the SAM. BArak-8 will not be going on this ship.

        Without removing RBU, there is no space deep enough to fit the long BrahMos VLS. Harpoons need upper deck space again, which means that RBU would need to be removed if any AShM would be fitted. India wont be fitting any AShM. The only possibility is for an export version without RBU and AShM in it’s place.

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      5. Thanks.
        I didn’t say India fitting AshMs but for PhN, my doubt about MICA is that Maitri missile deal still seams away & if IN wanted MICA then it would have been already fitted.

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      6. No. JUst like India waited to put Barak-8 on Kolkata, I am sure they will wait for a few years till the MICA deal goes through and then put the VL-Mica on the Kamortas. It may take 2 years or so, but there is no hurry as the Kamorta is primarily an ASW platform.

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  19. Komorta as light frigate for the Philippine Navy? Almost, but not yet. The heavy corvette and the incheon are the only responsive bids, meaning they both comply with the PN specifications. While the Komorta has been declared the lowest calculated bid, meanings its cheaper, it still has to pass the post qualification.. The lowest bidder wins in bidding. So yes, the Komorta won the bidding.

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  20. Hey guys amazing article, Is the news that Kamorta will be armed with Barak-8 true? And if so is it necessary to have MF-STAR for it or CAR will work? Thanks.

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      1. I don’t trust media sources a lot. They are prone to a lot of errors. France is already integrating CAR with VL-Mica. Barak-8 is highly unlikely. Unless there is confirmation from an official source, Barak-8 on Kamorta is just speculation. Do you have any other sources?

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      2. Thanks.
        I reactivated my WP account just to comment on it, excellent work.
        Now I agree with you, IN has mentioned it’s interest in Maitri but during recent visit of French PM on Indian republic day there was no mention about it, but I agree that Barak 8 is too big for P17.
        I have some other sources but all these are almost same.
        If VL MICA is coming then it would be great addition for IN & also for exports.

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      1. The 6km range is for the MANPADS CIWS, I’m talking about the FFBNW VLS system, we are still undecided what VLS and what missile we will use

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    1. Small modifications can be made where RHIBS are stored. Harpoons can be fitted practically in any open space on a ship. That’s it’s major advantage.

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  21. I’d like to apologize in advance to any Kamorta fans who want to see export Kamortas in action abroad especially with news that Kamorta was chosen for the Philippine Navy, we are about to elect the stupidest president we have ever had, and the ships will most likely never see action in six years

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      1. The forerunner in our presidential race is strictly against military modernization and wishes to cancel the contracts for our frigates and fighter jets, if he does win, he will either find a way to cancel the contract for the Kamortas or just cancel the deals to be made to purchase ammunition and a VLS system

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      2. For decades, the Philippine military has been left behind due to lack of political will to modernize it

        AFP modernization started in the 1950’s when President Diosdado Macapagal aimed to make the Philippines a powerful nation, under his term, he acquired used American frigates, and F-5A/B fighter jets along with new missiles and torpedoes.

        When President Macapagal stepped down, he was succeeded by President Ferdinand Marcos, under the first six years of President’s Marcos’s term, the AFP thrived, acquiring APC’s from the US, used F-8 fighter jets, and more used American frigates, corvettes and LST’s, under the first six years of his term, the AFP boasted a capable military. Sadly, President Marcos became corrupt and declared martial law. Using the military to ensure that he stayed in power. Finally after 21 dark years of Martial Law, the corrupt government was overthrown. However, the military was forever tainted with the atrocities it committed under President Marcos.

        Succeeding President Marcos was President Corazon Aquino. No major military acquisitions were made under her term due to the fact that the past president had robbed the nation’s coffers blind leaving no money available to arm the military. The public did not want to modernize the military in fear that it be used by another dictator. Angered at this, the AFP attempted three coups against her. Although none of the coups proved successful, the military was once again tainted.

        Succeeding President Aquino was President Fidel Ramos. A military man, President Ramos sought to modernize the military even with the huge debt of the nation by selling real estate from Army bases. He was successful in acquiring three modern corvettes and two LSV’s for the Navy, he was successful in reviving the Air Force’s F-5 fighters. However, his plans did not all come to fruition as so much of the money made from selling real estate was stolen by corrupt officials.

        Following President Ramos was President Estrada, under his term, he ordered the military to wage an all-out war against the rebels and insurgents that plagued the nation’s Southern parts. Under his term he acquired helicopters, howitzers, APC’s, rifles and weapons to be used for fighting rebels. President Estrada however was impeached for allegations of corruption.

        Following President Estrada was President Arroyo, the daughter of President Macapagal. Many dared hope she would follow in her father’s footsteps. Sadly, under her term, the military acquired a BARE MINIMUM of assets, such as a few dozen APC’s, and used helicopters. An LPD project was planned but the project was riddled with so many allegations of corruption that it was scrapped.

        The latest president, President Aquino was faced with the problem of a weak military and a hostile China taking over Filipino territory. He sought to once again return the military to its place as one of the most powerful in ASEAN, and set an 18-year plan to modernize the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Under his term which is to end by July, He acquired three used Hamilton-class USCG cutters for the Navy, he also restarted the past president’s LPD project and acquired two LPD’s along with AAV’s to use alongside the LPD’s, he acquired new rifles, vehicles, combat utility helicopters and light attack helicopters. In addition, he acquired the crow jewel of AFP modernization. The FA-50 Fighting Eagle. The acquisition brought the most senior Air Force commanders to tears to see the 5th Fighter Wing fly once again. He started the current frigate program in which the Kamorta class is undergoing post qualification tests before a contract is awarded. He also acquired two AW-159 ASW helos to use for the frigates. The Army was brought to tears to see President Aquino parade more than a hundred APC’s he acquired from the US. So far, President Aquino has done more to modernize the military than three of his predecessors, and rivals the acquisitions of Presidents Macapagal and Marcos.

        However, leading in the race to be President Aquino’s successor is Mayor Duterte of Davao City who believes that the military is a waste of money and wants the contracts for the remaining FA-50’s, the ASW helos, and the new frigates cancelled. As of now, the military’s modernization is in jeopardy.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. It seems you are more desperate than others for this ship…
      I think presidential term for Philippines is too long, it must be 4 years for countries like Philippines which is small & homogeneous, you can hold election easily without any problem in 4 years & can through non-performing govt early after 4 years…
      Problem arises for countries like India which is too big & diverse, for even a single election process takes more than 6 months, this time prime ministerial candidates was announced 2 years before election & campaigning started on same day…
      Still our single term is 5 years.

      Like

      1. Nothing is final, the tender is ongoing. What R1TAN means is one of the frontrunners in the May 10 presidential elections is on record as willing to surrender Philippine territory in exchange for Chinese-funded public works projects. He is like the Philippines’ own version of Donald Trump, down to the sexism and pandering to the lowest common denominator, except this guy happens to be a self-proclaimed socialist and has promised cabinet positions to multiple terrorist organizations. Needless to say he considers modernizing the armed forces a waste of money.

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      2. we do 6 years because basically in the president’slast year he doesn’t get to do much because there will be plenty of bullsh*t thrown at him for making midnight deals

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      3. Reply to “we do 6 years because basically in the president’s last year he doesn’t get to do much because there will be plenty of bullsh*t thrown at him for making midnight deals”
        It happens everywhere, while in India we almost lost 10 years 2004-14 because of bad govt second time didn’t had option except to re-elect him…
        For us problem is conducting elections for 1250 million people that’s we have 5-year term.
        Do you use electronic voting or conventional?
        For ships only 2 ships can’t shift power especially where tilt is too much.
        Have you heard any new news?

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      4. If GRSE receives order it will be our biggest defense export till now, In India defense industry was ran by state private sector was not allowed to manufacture but now things are changing pvt sectors has made good progress in last decade & in this year Pvt sector will start Mfg helicopter & transport plane & already making components of fighter planes, hull of our nuclear submarines is built by pvt shipyard L&T, also many other parts. In last years, many projects progressed just because pvt sector players…
        Obviously, we want to export it, in 2014 GRSE exported first Indian newly built big OPV to Mauritius & 1 on order, GSL is building ships for Sri Lanka, Mauritius & may be Vietnam & Oman. L&T is competing to supply ships to Indonesia, GRSE provided consultancy to build stealth frigates of Myanmar Aung Zeya Class & Kyan Sittha-class frigate.
        Before that only used ships donated& exported(Built in India) to Sri Lanka, Mauritius & Seychelles.
        But all these was OPVs without much weapons.
        Myanmar navy ships are big.
        We usually didn’t exported because we didn’t wanted to spoil our relations with their opposite countries.
        Now we are exited to export something which we make.

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      5. Two brand new frigates will be more than enough to raise the morale of dozens of Filipino sailors, two brand new frigates can raise support for AFP modernization by showing the public the results, that’s why we want two brand new frigates so badly, lastly, two brand new frigates will be the first brand new surface combatants of the Navy, and of course we have certain politicians who are against spending for military

        Like

  22. Good news! An award for the Kamorta may be released by the last week of April or first week of May! To our Indian friends on Defencyclopedia, we hope that the ships are delivered on time so that we may consider buying more Indian products in the future.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Thanks buddy. I heard it as a rumor. So I thought I will confirm. But just a question, wouldn’t Python-5 make better SRSAM then VL MICA hypothetically?

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      2. No. The Python-5 is IR guided. The VL-Mica is radar guided with an IR option. Also it has longer range than the python-5.

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      1. aaa I see, there are “rumors” circulating that the Navy wants to get an AAW frigate in the future after gaining experience from operating GP frigates, would it then be feasible to make a bigger Kamorta, say 3750-4000 tons to accomodate MF-STAR and 32 Barak 8 VLS cells?

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      2. Definitely. Take the Israeli Saar 5 for example. It’s a 1200 ton ship with a smaller version of MF-Star and 16 Barak-8. The present Kamorta can be stretched and fitted with similar systems to make a 4000 ton AAW frigate.

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  23. *UNOFFICIAL*

    A source posted on Facebook GRSE failed post-qualification. Reason: insufficient capital on the part of GRSE. This is the same person who revealed GRSE outbid the field weeks before the govt. confirmed the same. Next step: possible motion for reconsideration, a favorable decision gives the contract to GRSE regardless of the outcome of PQ for Hyundai, the second-lowest bidder.

    *UNCONFIRMED*

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    1. Thanks for notifying. He has at least mentioned the source in the pictures. But he should have provided source for the article along with the link. It’s not right to directly copy paste. Thanks again.

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      1. Manila Livewire is a hoax site. Any decent Filipino military enthusiast ignores Manila Livewire.

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      1. GRSE’s delays in delivering the first Kamortas to the Indian Navy, they failed the net contracting capacity requirement, although officials from the Philippine Navy said GRSE could easily correct this, GRSE for some reason chose not to, allowing the second-lowest bidder, Hyundai to win

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  24. ????? What are u taking about ?? The INS Kamorta is a Class of 4 Ships and A possible 8 Addition already 2 are commissioned and 2 this and next year

    You Statement HAS ABSOLUTE no bearing with the IN

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  25. ????? What are u taking about ?? The INS Kamorta is a Class of 4 Ships and A possible 8 Addition already 2 are commissioned and 2 this and next year

    You Statement HAS ABSOLUTE no bearing with the IN

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      1. The Indian shipyard failed due to financial ability to build the ships before the payment upon completion, basically not having deep pockets. The Philippines wish to make only one payment, not several as the ships are being built. Appears though the Indian government will step in and guarantee funds to finish the ships before the Philippines pay upon completion… There is a old saying it isn’t over until it is over…

        Like

  26. Can you please right a post on submarine hunters like an asw helicopter can cover how much area?how converter works in tracking submarine etc., Thanks

    Like

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